<address id="1a55" ></address>
  • <option id="1a55" ></option>

    1. <samp id="1a55" ></samp>

    2. <p id="1a55" ></p>
      1. <listing id="1a55" ></listing><li id="1a55" ><tt id="1a55" ></tt></li>
        The Object Collection

        The Collections
        Today at the Cathedral View More
        8:00am Eucharist
        8:30am Doors open for sightseeing
        8:30am Morning Prayer
        12:30pm Eucharist
        4:00pm Last entry for sightseeing
        5:00pm Evening Prayer

        东方心经

        Read More >

        The nature of the Object Collection is a testament to the long and varied life of the Cathedral. The earliest surviving items date from Roman London, the early and later medieval periods are represented, and the preponderance of the collections unquestionably relates to the life of the Wren Cathedral, 1675 to the present.

        Famous artists and designers such as Sir James Thornhill, Mary Beale, Lord Frederick Leighton, Auguste Rodin, John Singer Sargent, Henry Moore, Eric Gill and Beryl Dean, as well as many highly skilled but unrecorded craftspeople, have employed their talents equipping, furnishing and embellishing St Paul’s. As a result the Cathedral houses a treasure trove of noteworthy art works and ornate functional items.


        The Object Collection can be broadly categorized as follows: Altars and Fonts; Architectural Components; Bells; Casts; Church Plate; Clocks and Dials; Coins, Medals and Seals; Furniture; Monuments; Mosaics and Tiled Surfaces; Musical Instruments; Prints, Drawings and Paintings; Sculpture; Textiles and Embroideries; Vessels and Ornaments; and Vestments.

        Some highlights include carved and painted stones from the pre-fire Cathedral, and a cope, designed by Beryl Dean for HM The Queen's Silver Jubilee in 1977, which features the towers and spires of the churches of the Diocese of London.

        Simon Carter,
        Collections Manager
        scarter@stpaulscathedral.org.uk
        ?0207 246 8325
        Follow the Collections
        Twitter Icon